Stanley Fish on the Cross of Doubt

The religions I know are about nothing but doubt and dissent, and the struggles of faith, the dark night of the soul, feelings of unworthiness, serial backsliding, the abyss of despair. Whether it is the book of Job, the Confessions of St. Augustine, Calvin’s Institutes, Bunyan’s “Grace Abounding to The Chief of Sinners,” Kierkegaard’s “Fear and Trembling” and a thousand other texts, the religious life is depicted as one of aspiration within the conviction of frailty. The heart of that life, as Eagleton reminds us, is not a set of propositions about the world (although there is some of that), but an orientation toward perfection by a being that is radically imperfect.

About Santi Tafarella

I teach writing and literature at Antelope Valley College in California.
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1 Response to Stanley Fish on the Cross of Doubt

  1. Diane says:

    Virgil is Dante’s guide in the first part of the Divine Comedy where, “In the middle of the road of my life I awoke in the dark wood where the true way was wholly lost…

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