Some more ELO (accompanied by clips of John Travolta, Olivia Newton John, and Jamie Lee Curtis when they were young and beautiful)

And the Twin Towers also make a brief cameo.

About Santi Tafarella

I teach writing and literature at Antelope Valley College in California.
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6 Responses to Some more ELO (accompanied by clips of John Travolta, Olivia Newton John, and Jamie Lee Curtis when they were young and beautiful)

  1. Hi Santi

    I happened to notice this unfortunate news about ELO, and thought of you: ELO cellist killed by hay bale in freak van Devon crash

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-11195393

    • santitafarella says:

      Spritzo:

      How awful and absurd. And I’m thinking of the butterfly effect: if I hadn’t put those two ELO videos up recently, out of love for ELO, maybe the rippling out of that nonaction would have made the universe as a whole just a slight tad different than it was today, and that tad would have made the bale of hay miss him by an inch, or not fall off the back of the truck when it did. I feel oddly responsible (and, of course, what you chose for breakfast a month ago makes you oddly responsible as well). You can never predict the ultimate results of your actions and how they might ripple out into space and time, can you?:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly_effect

      —Santi

      • Awful and absurd, indeed.

        I certainly don’t hold you (or me) responsible.

        I wonder if there’s an infinite chain effect on the butterfly effect that means no-one is ultimately responsible? (Except g0d, if she is there?) ie my breakfast a month ago caused this crash, but a leaf falling in my neighbour’s garden caused my breakfast… all the way back to the big bang.

        It’s the big bang’s fault! 😉

      • santitafarella says:

        Spritzo:

        Kant’s default position was do what is good and honest because you can never know the ultimate consequences of your actions anyway. His example is this: if you are hiding a friend who is fleeing a killer, and the killer comes to the door and asks for your friend, you should tell him honestly that he is there.

        Why?

        Because, for all you know, your friend has already made it out the window, fleeing the scene. If you lie, however, the killer might not waste valuable time searching the house, and, on leaving, see your friend running away!

        —Santi

      • Santi

        Haha, that sounds like Kant. It’s been a while since I studied him. I’m not sure I agree, but I see the point.

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